Anatomy of a style 3: Surface simplicity

My first step on the meditation path coincided with my jump into ceramics. In the last year I have come to see that the two are connected. Both are part of my quest for authentic being and centred peace. That is why the form has to come from the shapes that interest me and why the surfaces have to have both simplicity and depth.

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My work is designed to be used so I believe it should complement and frame the contents, not make an attention-seeking attempt to upstage whatever you are using it for- whether that's a delicious meal or a collection of spare screws. I therefore opt for the simplicity of one colour glazing.

However, a pot should not be so simple it is dull and boring. It may be seen whilst sitting on a shelf waiting to be used and needs to earn it's place in a person's home. So I aim for designs that are interesting enough to enjoy empty and give pleasure while on display.

Like a piece of good music rather than a pop song, I look to ensure a pot has depth of character that will reward both long-term looking whilst on display and repeated use:

  • Each pot is part glazed and part unglazed, to emphasise the articulations of the form as you look at it from a distance.
  • Looking more closely you'll see that I seek out glazes with a subtle richness that reward close observation and make each piece quietly individual through tiny crystals or flashing or crackles or a pearskin texture etc.
  • The part glazing also unveils the texture of the clay to both eye and hand. The fingers are incredibly sensitive to the nuances of touch so I like to give them something to discover in unglazed and burnished clay, smooth surfaces and incised lines,

All of these elements I hope combine in my distinctive style to make viewing, holding and using the work a more satisfying experience. It is my way of offering you a moment of your own authenticity and centredness, of peace in a bonkers world.